If you are thinking about bringing a kitten into your family, or if you have recently added a new furkid, it’s time to start planning for your kitten’s future. Once you get past the cute noses, whiskers, paws, and affectionate purrs, you have a kitten who will behave, well, like a kitten! Your kitten will explore your home as her curiosity grows. Unfortunately, that also means she could get herself into some unexpected trouble. In an emergency, pet insurance can be the difference between top treatment for your furbaby and having to make decisions based on limited funds. Here are the top 4 reasons why your kitten needs pet insurance.

Long haired kitten poses for the camera.

1. Kittens have weak immune systems.

It’s important to take your kitten regularly to the veterinarian, and not just for routine vaccinations. Until their immune systems develop and strengthen, kittens are highly vulnerable to certain diseases and parasites. Those medical conditions may include any of the following:

Treatment for any of these diseases or parasites can be costly. If your kitten has pet insurance coverage before these illnesses occur, your policy will cover a percentage of the bill. In many cases, that policy saves pet parents high costs.

2. Kittens are curious by nature.

When you have a kitten in your home, be prepared to find her in all sorts of strange places. After all, curiosity is a vital component of a cat’s nature. Their ancestors were curious about the world around them, especially as a way to remain safe from predators. Cats also developed this trait further through their hunting instincts; today, we see that curiosity at work whenever our cats watch and chatter at the birds in the window.

What does this mean for kittens? By three weeks old, kittens are taking on the world, investigating anything and everything they can (literally) get into. That curiosity can sometimes cause accidents to happen. Anything from falling off a counter to ingesting foreign materials will earn your kitten a swift trip to the veterinary emergency clinic. Those visits are expensive, with the average costs of emergency visits totaling between $800 - $1,500; these are costs that are difficult for many pet parents to pay. A pet insurance policy for your kitten will reimburse those costs according to your choice of coverage.

3. Beat pre-existing conditions before they develop.

No pet insurance company offers insurance for pets with pre-existing conditions. That’s one reason why it’s essential to purchase a pet insurance plan for your kitten while she is young and healthy. Should a disease or illness occur in the future, the situation is covered by your pet insurance because your kitten did not have this medical condition before you purchased a policy for her. An inexpensive pet insurance policy now will pay significant dividends for you in the future.

Kitten plays on the floor.

4. Kittens have inexpensive coverage and lower premiums.

It’s best to get a pet insurance policy for your kitten when she is young because the younger the pet, the lower the premium. Additionally, obtaining coverage for your kitten means that the plan you choose will be inexpensive and well worth it as your kitten grows into cathood. Sadly, cats have a history of developing various illnesses, and one in five cats will be diagnosed with cancer. To have those medical conditions covered when they affect your cat, you want to purchase a pet insurance policy when your feline friend is a young kitten.

Start protecting your kitten while she’s young.

With a pet insurance policy, you can have peace of mind knowing that your kitten will have access to the best medical care, medicines, and high-tech procedures. Even better, you won’t have to foot the whole bill when it arrives. Depending on your pet insurance plan, your company will cover between 70 - 90% of the veterinary charges. If you have brought a new kitten into your life, take a few moments to get a free pet insurance quote. You and your kitten will be thankful you did.
 

References:

 

  1. Wilson, G. (2021). It’s Kitten Season: Diseases Often Found in Young Cats. Retrieved from https://www.zoetispetcare.com/blog/article/kitten-season-diseases
  2. Colorado Animal Rescue. (2021). Upper Respiratory Infection in Kittens. Retrieved from https://www.coloradoanimalrescue.org/upper-respiratory-infection-in-kittens/
  3. Page, A. (2021). What is FIV? Retrieved from https://kittenrescue.org/2017/03/what-is-fiv/
  4. Iovan, D. (2019). Raina’s Story: Caring for a Kitten with Feline Leukemia. Retrieved from https://ferndalecatshelter.org/blog/caring-for-a-kitten-with-feline-leukemia/
  5. Burston, C. (2021). Why Are Cats So Curious? The Science Behind Cat Curiosity. Retrieved from https://caredicat.com/why-are-cats-so-curious/
  6. Weir-Jimerson, K. (2020). The Real Reason Your Cat Chatters at the Window. Retrieved from https://www.dailypaws.com/cats-kittens/behavior/common-cat-behaviors/cat-chattering
  7. Barnette, C. (2021). How much does an emergency vet cost? And how can you pay for one? Retrieved from https://www.petsradar.com/advice/How-Much-Does-an-Emergency-Vet-Cost
  8. ASPCA. (n.d.). Common Cat Diseases. Retrieved from https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/common-cat-diseases
  9. Rau Animal Hospital. (n.d.). Types of Cat Cancer and Their Common Symptoms. Retrieved from https://www.rauanimalhospital.com/resources/blog/cats/4-types-cat-cancer-and-their-common-symptoms