Do You Want to Adopt a Rescue Dog?

Adopting a rescue dog is one of the kindest acts a human can perform. Did you know that more than 670,000 shelter dogs are euthanized each year because nobody wanted to give them a second chance?

Deciding to adopt a rescue dog is a huge act of kindness and responsibility. But maybe you need some bringing home a rescue dog advice?

Here’s what you need to know about rescuing a dog and how to prep your home for your new family member.

Rescue dog smiles with happiness.


Adopting a Rescue Dog: Where to Start

If you’ve answered the question, “Why should I adopt a dog?” and know you’re ready to adopt responsibly, you’re ready to get the process started.

 The first step is to find a rescue shelter near you. Thankfully, there are thousands of shelters across the nation. It’s rare to live somewhere that doesn’t have at least one. Visit them to begin the adoption process.

Shelter workers are experts at matching the right family with the right dog. Whether adopting an adult dog or rescuing a puppy, they’ll help you through every step of the process.

What You Need to Know About Bringing Home a Shelter Dog

Some people are hesitant about bringing home a shelter dog. After all, there are a lot of myths about bringing a new dog home from the shelter. Here are just a few myths about shelter dogs. 

  • Damaged Pups. Most shelter dogs are not damaged. The most common reason owners give up their dogs is a death in the family or financial issues.
  • Untrained Dogs. Most shelter dogs are already house trained and acclimate to new homes with ease.
  • Mixed Breeds Only. Shelters have plenty of purebred dogs, so if you have your heart set on a specific breed, you can find them at a shelter.

Now that you know that the most pervasive myths are, indeed, completely false, here’s what to know when adopting a dog.

Bully mix stares at the camera with soulful eyes.


5 Tips for Adopting a Dog

 The adoption process is more in-depth than simply walking out of a shelter with a new dog. Shelters all have screening processes that ensure the best possible chance for their dogs.

Our top tips for adopting a dogs include: 

1. Make Multiple Visits

Don’t expect to get a dog upon your first visit. It’s important to make multiple visits to ensure that you adopt a rescue dog that fits your personality, space, and needs. Many times, staff can help match you with the right pup.

2. Be Prepared for an Interview

As part of the screening process, most shelters will ask you about your family situation, work situation, and any existing pets in the house.

Don’t be offended by the specific nature of the questions. It’s all about making sure you’re the right forever home for the dog.

3. Budget for Your Dog

One of the most common reasons people send their dogs to shelters is they can no longer afford their pets.

Adoption fees at most shelters range from $100-$300. However, you need to budget for food, microchipping, visits to the vet, basic supplies, and pet insurance.

4.Pick a Dog That Fits Your Lifestyle 

How much free time you have will determine the right breed for you. Rescuing a puppy requires far more of your time and attention than rescuing a dog in its senior years.

Plus, some breeds simply require more attention. Large dog breeds need to be walked up to three times per day. Do you have that amount of time available?

5. Be Flexible

You may have your heart set on a specific dog but try to be flexible. Not every shelter will have what you need. It’s good practice to return for multiple visits and meet various dogs.

You never know which dog you might fall in love with during your visit!

Rescue dogs runs in enjoyment.

Bringing Home a Shelter Dog: How to Make a Successful Transition

Congratulations! You’ve decided to adopt a rescue dog, and you’re ready to bring them home. The transition stage can be tough. Follow these tips to plan for a successful transition.

Step One – Plan Your Home in Advance

Establish where your new dog will spend most of its time. This includes dog proofing, setting up crate training, and preparing a vocabulary list for commanding your dog.

You should also prepare for any additional vaccinations not given by the shelter and register the dog’s microchip.

Step Two – Introducing Your New Dog

Your dog will be nervous and anxious during the first few days. Avoid getting all your friends and family around to meet them as it can overwhelm them.

When it comes to other pets, introductions should be done gradually and on neutral ground.

Ultimately, it’s all about patience and understanding.

Step Three – Begin Training Immediately

Dogs need leadership and discipline. Begin the training process within the first few days of taking your new family member home. This can include basic one-on-one training or signing them up for group classes.

Conclusion

A new pet is an exciting time, but you also need to keep them safe. Pet insurance covers all those unplanned medical emergencies.

When you adopt a rescue dog, give them the best possible protection. Contact Pet Insurance Review for a free pet insurance quote today.