Pet Wellness Guides > Blueberries for Dogs: Are They a Healthy Snack? - Pet Insurance Review

Blueberries for Dogs: Are They a Healthy Snack?

Posted: 12/01/2023 | BY: Jenna Bruce | Categories: Dog , Pet care , Top Tips

The humble blueberry: that tiny fruit that’s packed with tons of antioxidants that help us fight off diseases. Blueberries make a delicious and healthy snack for humans, but what about blueberries for dogs? Is that a good idea?

Let’s take a deeper dive into whether or not dogs should eat blueberries.

blueberries for dogs

Can Dogs Eat Blueberries?

Blueberries are not only safe for dogs to eat, they offer them the same health benefits as they do us. Along with those antioxidants we just mentioned, blueberries are also full of healthy fiber, which can help dogs that suffer from constipation. And blueberries also boast a lot of beneficial vitamins and minerals, including:

  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin K
  • Calcium
  • Phosphorus
  • Potassium
  • Magnesium

These vitamins and minerals can keep your pup’s eyes, bones, brains and other organs and systems healthy as they age.

When Should You Not Feed Your Dog Blueberries?

While blueberries make a healthy snack for most dogs, there are those dogs who should probably not eat blueberries. If your pup has been diagnosed with diabetes (fruits contain sugar), has food allergies or sensitivities, or is on a prescription diet or medication to manage a medical condition, blueberries may not be a good idea. As always, we recommend you speak with your vet before adding any new foods into your dog’s diet. 

If you have a small dog, blueberries may also pose a choking hazard, especially if feeding frozen blueberries. That doesn’t mean your pup can’t benefit from all of those vitamins and minerals, but it does mean you’ll need to cut up the blueberries into smaller pieces or throw some into a blender and that way. 

Can Dogs Eat Blueberry Muffins?

If your pup is giving you those big, sad brown eyes as you bite into your blueberry muffin, don’t let him guilt you into sharing any. While blueberries for dogs are a healthy idea, that muffin has a lot of other ingredients your dog shouldn’t eat. The sugar and fat are really no good for dogs. And there are other sweeteners and spices, like chocolate, nutmeg and xylitol, that are actually toxic to dogs.

Now, should your dog scarf down a small bite of blueberry muffin you dropped on the floor, there is no need to panic as they will most likely be fine. However if your dog ate one or more muffins while you weren’t looking and those muffins may have had toxic ingredients, call your vet right away.

Can Dogs Eat Blueberry Yogurt?

It’s not a good idea to feed your dog blueberry yogurt from the store. Again, any processed food you didn’t make yourself will most likely contain added sugars and potentially toxic ingredients. 

Plain yogurt without any extra sugar or xylitol is good for dogs, in moderation. So if you happen to have plain yogurt with NOTHING else in it and want to put a dollop in a bowl with a few blueberries as a treat, that should be fine.

How Many Blueberries Can Dogs Eat?

Any extra foods or treats, even if healthy, should only be fed in moderation. While low in calories, extra calories are still extra calories so you don’t want to feed too many blueberries at a time. Also, all of that fiber at one time could give your dog an upset stomach. So, as always, feed in moderation.

OK, but what does “moderation” actually look like? It means that for very small dogs like chihuahuas and pugs they could have one to two blueberries a day as a treat, cut up. Do NOT give tiny dogs whole blueberries, especially not frozen blueberries, as they could pose a choking hazard.

Small dogs like Beagles and Corgis could have 2-4 blueberries a day as a treat, while medium dogs like Border Collies and Basset Hounds should be fine with 4-5 blueberries each day. Large dogs like Retrievers and Shepherds should be okay with 6 or 7 a day while extra large dogs like Newfies and Great Danes are ok with a small handful.

Again, these are just general guidelines and are not meant to take the place of directions from your vet. Give your vet’s office a call and simply ask if it’s okay to feed blueberries and if so, how many.

Final Thoughts

Blueberries for dogs – is it a good idea? Yes, it’s a great idea! Just be sure to check with your veterinarian first to get their feeding guidelines. And never feed your pup blueberry muffins, yogurt or any other processed foods that have a blueberry flavor, as they may contain ingredients that are harmful, if not downright toxic, to your dog.

Pet Insurance – Another Healthy Treat for You and Your Pup!

Did you know that each year, 1 out of 3 pets will require emergency medical care? Often this care comes with a very big bill in the thousands of dollars. Are you financially prepared should your pup become seriously ill or injured?

Pet insurance helps to offset the costs of veterinary care. There are actually some plans that will reimburse you for 90% of the vet bill. That can really bring pet parents peace of mind.

If you’ve been thinking about pet insurance but weren’t sure what provider is the best, here are the top providers based on reviews from pet parents just like you:

 

Top Pet Insurance Providers of 2024

RatingProviderTotal Review
4.9Embrace14,440
4.9Healthy Paws7,497
4.9Trupanion60,400
4.9Fetch2,372
4.9Lemonade795
4.8Nationwide21,394
4.8Prudent Pet125
4.7ASPCA11,500
4.7Hartville164
4.7PetPartners111
4.7Spot5,753
4.6MetLife526
4.5Pets Best7,216
4.4AKC889
4.4Figo2,617
4.3Pet Assure12
4.3Pumpkin1,256
3.2ManyPets2,266

 

References:

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/fruits-vegetables-dogs-can-and-cant-eat

https://www.petmd.com/dog/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-blueberries

https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/xylitol-toxicity-in-dogs

 

Disclaimer

The information contained on this blog is intended for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice. It is not a substitute for professional veterinary care. Always consult with your veterinarian before making any changes to your pet's health care or treatment plan.

The authors of this blog are not veterinarians and do not claim to be experts in pet health. The information provided here is based on our own experiences and research, as well as information from reputable sources. However, we cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of this information.

We encourage you to do your own research and consult with your veterinarian before making any decisions about your pet's health.

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