My picky eater pups turn their noses up at kibble and only eat it as a last resort. This can be frustrating especially when traveling or someone is watching them. To get my dogs to eat on a regular schedule, I top their dry food with canned dog food and mix it up, and then they will scarf it down. 

My small dog however will do a couple of laps, sniff his bowl, and after 5 minutes of contemplating it, will finally eat his food, and usually ends his meal by licking his dog sister’s bowl clean too. 

I recently watched a friend’s dog, and she brought over these portioned packages of food that my dogs of course were very curious about. These packets were portioned out based on her weight and told me exactly how much to feed her each meal. It was called The Farmer’s Dog, and it actually looked appetizing in comparison to any other dog food I’ve ever tried because it was clearly real meat and veggies all ground up together. 

I decided to research this food and found there are several options for this “human-grade” dog food that is delivered as a subscription service in the mail. The two most popular brands seemed to be The Farmer’s Dog and Ollie, so I did the trial for each to see which one my dogs prefer. Here is my comparison of the two services: 

Farmers Dog

The Farmer’s Dog 

The Farmer’s Dog asks you a series of questions such as your dog’s weight and body type before measuring out exactly how many calories they recommend. You can then choose between their recipes like chicken or turkey, put in your credit card and address info, and a box of frozen dog food packs show up at your house just a few days later. 

My dogs went crazy the first time I fed them The Farmer’s Dog. They thought they were getting a fat bowl of human food and ate it so fast that they had it on their noses after. Even my small dog who was always hesitant with his dog food scarfed it down without doing his usual laps around the kitchen. 

On my end, the packets were messy to serve. My small dog only got ¼ of a packet so I had to cut into the packet and try to seal it up for two days. It seemed like it got everywhere, and because of that I actually preferred giving them Ollie. 

 

Ollie

Ollie

Ollie seemed to be the exact same food-wise for my dogs, but instead, the packets were individually wrapped per day make it easier to serve. The downside to this is technically more plastic wrap is wasted. Ollie also included Tupperware with a scoop for the leftovers after breakfast. 

Recipe-wise they seemed about the same, and my dogs went crazy for Ollie just as they did the Farmer’s Dog. 

The most important thing to note though is that Ollie’s was more expensive than the Farmer’s Dog. For two small dogs, I was looking at doubling my monthly expense of what I had been spending on dog food before. 

Both services were convenient and easy to use until it came to canceling of course. Now I get their regular emails trying to get me back as a customer, but spending $100 per week on dog food is not in my budget at the time. 

I will say I have noticed more stinky farts when they went back to eating their kibble with a wet dog food topper. As much as I wish I could afford to give my pets the food service they loved, the cost is significantly more expensive than the traditional dog food method. 

 

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